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20121205
20121213
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and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't settle the fiscal cliff issue. he's chief economist of moody's analytics. so mark falling off the fiscal cliff means bad things. how bad? >> it could be quite bad, susie. i don't think it's if we get into january and we haven't settled this but if house makers haven't nailed this down by early february, i think stock investors, bond investors will start to get very very nervous, start selling, risky businesses pull back and by the end of february when we start approaching the ceiling for the debt limit, i think we'll be back in recession. it will be a fairly severe recession. so policy makers have a few weeks but not much more than that. they have to get this together. >> susie: some people are saying that today's jobs report is very encouraging and that you can look at this as a way that maybe the economy can handle some stuff belt tightening because things are looking a little bit bett
with no agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff. economists warn that if higher taxes and less government spending go into effect for many months next year, the u.s. could sink back into recession. so expect reporter questions on that topic at the fed's question and answer session after the policy announcement. >> he's going to reiterate to politicians to get their acts together for some sort of long-term deficit reduction plan. >> reporter: the stock market often rises when the fed announces economic stimulus measures. but that may not happen tomorrow. some experts think the overhang of the fiscal cliff will likely dampen investor enthusiasm. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: the latest economic statistics the federal reserve can consider is the october trade balance, with american importing a record amount of stuff from china. that increased our trade deficit to $42.2 billion. u.s. exports fell 3.6%, the biggest drop in almost four years. imports also fell, down 2.1% to the lowest in 20 months. on wall street, the dow gained 78, the nasdaq rose 44, the s& up nine. >> susie: our next guest says t
in virginia, the president once again pressed for congress to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> if this family has a couple of thousand dollars less to spend, that translates into $200 billion of less consumer spending next year. and that's bad for businesses, large and small. >> reporter: behind the scenes, the two sides are talking again. but there was no progress in public. senators today fought over the debt limit, and ended up deadlocked over a bill to allow the president to automatically increase borrowing. >> he's shown what he is really after is unprecedented powers to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. >> reporter: if the debt limit isn't raised, the country can't pay for the spending congress has already approved. and economists say the nation pays a high price for this kind of brinksmanship. >> business people aren't going to engage unless they have clarity with respect to this thing. >> reporter: but few insiders expect to find much clarity from washington in the coming weeks. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: investors will beor mn those fiscal cliff talks, and th
cuts. the phenomenon known as the fiscal cliff. if that happens, it will trigger a recession, or worse. so, president obama is taking action and insisting that republicans agree to increase the existing marginal tax rates on the wealthiest top 2% of u.s. taxpayers. and of course, there is more to the deal. but there will be no negotiations on that big part of the deal unless that tax on the wealthiest 2% is negotiated now. the president could not be more emphatic in stressing the indispensable element of surmounting the cliff is that super-rich revenue. >> we're not insisting on rates just out of spite. or out of any kind of partisan bickering. but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> okay. here is john boehner, the republican house speaker. >> if you look at the plans that the white house have talked about thus far, they couldn't pass either house of the congress. >> republicans proposed raising $800 billion in extra revenues. and that revenue should come through tax reform and closing loopholes. happy new year. question, patrick, looking into the crystal ba
is that the fiscal cliff isn't really a cliff, it's more like a slope and you could gradually go down it and the withholding from tax wouldn't kick in for a while and the spending cuts wouldn't hurt the economy for a while. do you think it is good idea to go over the deliver and it is more of a slope. >> no, i think would be a mistake to go over the fiscal cliff because it could set in motion lots of things that could be a drag on the economy. that being said, i think if it's clear that the parties were working toward a negotiation, that you could spill into january without doing any irreversible damage. >> one of the ideas that seems to now be on the table is this idea of moving to a more accurate measure of inflation and using that to adjust social security benefits and tax brackets. is that something you could support in. >> well, i have two concerns with that. one is the general issue about dealing with social security in the context of these deficit reduction talks. because social security is fully solvent until the year 2033. after that point it would pay 75 cents on the dollar.
jay carney called on republicans to get serious about revenue. >> where are the president's spending cuts? the longer the white house slow-walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. now, if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he's got an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious? >> on that question of whether or not we have put forward specific spending cuts, the answer is is we have. not only that, we signed law a trillion dollars in specific spending cuts. so if you combine what is signed into law with what we proposed versus the total absence of any specificity from the republicans for a single dollar in revenue, i think in the battle of specificity, the outcome has already been decided. >> woodruff: and a short time ago an administration official told us the president and the speaker spoke by phone this evening. now to our series of conversations on this subject and what should be
in the coming days. online we have a report from our partners at kaiser health news on how the fiscal cliff could affect health care for the military and for medicare patients. >> brown: next, a potential crisis of a different kind, one that has new urgency after hurricane sandy and that also involves federal spending: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, travel
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7